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Looking To Get A Cheap Divorce In Texas?
Looking To Get A Cheap Divorce In Texas?

Complete Your Uncontested Divorce Forms Online
For
$99

WHY CHOOSE US?
  • Since 2012, We Have Helped Thousands
    Of People Get An Easy, Quick, Low-Cost
    Uncontested Divorce
  • 100% Court Acceptance Guarantee
  • Award Winning Customer Support (24/7)
  • Free Revisions To Your Documents
  • Let Our Experience Work For You
 
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The State to File Your Divorce

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of Your Spouse?
Do You Know the Location
of Your Spouse?

Can You and Your Spouse Agree
on the Terms of Your Divorce?

Check Eligibility
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Divorce in 4 Simple Steps
step 1
Check If You Qualify
step 2
Answer Detailed Questions
step 2
Review Completed Forms
step 3
File the Documents
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Complete Your Uncontested Divorce Forms Online For $99

WHY CHOOSE US?
  • Since 2012, We Have Helped Thousands Of People
    Get An Easy, Quick, Low-Cost Uncontested Divorce
  • 100% Court Acceptance Guarantee
  • Award Winning Customer Support (24/7)
  • Free Revisions To Your Documents
  • Let Our Experience Work For You
 
Start a Divorce

See if you Qualify

The State to File Your Divorce

Do You Know the Location
of Your Spouse?
Do You Know the Location
of Your Spouse?

Can You and Your Spouse Agree
on the Terms of Your Divorce?

Check Eligibility
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Texas Divorce in 4 Simple Steps

step 1
Check If You Qualify
step 2
Answer Detailed Questions
step 3
Review Completed Forms
step 4
File the Documents
Start a Divorce

For Over 10 Years,
LetsGetDivorced™ Online Divorce
Has Helped People File For An
Uncontested Divorce In Texas
That is Simple, Fast and Very Cheap.

judge writing in divorce court
LetsGetDivorced™ was founded by divorce attorney Jerry Bruckner who has over 25 years experience helping people with their legal problems. In 2012, Jerry established LetsGetDivorced™ to provide an inexpensive solution to a big legal and financial problem that many married couples encounter when they agree to get divorced.
Both spouses may want to get divorced and they can reach an agreement on all of the issues relating to their divorce (this is called an uncontested divorce or an amicable divorce).
However, their huge problem (which is very common), is that they cannot afford to pay thousands of dollars to hire a divorce attorney to prepare and file their uncontested divorce paperwork.
What these people needed was a way to file a very cheap divorce and receive assistance to complete their uncontested divorce forms and get detailed instructions how to file their divorce papers with the court.
LetsGetDivorced™ was founded with a company mission to make getting an agreed uncontested divorce simple, convenient and low-cost.
LetsGetDivorced™ has developed a very affordable 100% online divorce service. For only $99 you can complete your uncontested divorce forms online without an attorney, in as little as 15 minutes.
If you are thinking about filing a simple uncontested no-fault divorce in Texas and you do not want to pay an attorney's expensive legal fee to have your divorce forms prepared, then using LetsGetDivorced™ might be exactly the type of low-cost online uncontested divorce forms service that you are looking for.

Using an online divorce service like LetsGetDivorced™ is the cheapest way to get divorced.

LetsGetDivorced™ online divorce charges less than the discount legal fees charged by even cheap divorce attorneys to prepare uncontested divorce forms.

Our total fee Is Only  $99

LetsGetDivorced™ charges a flat "service fee" of only $99 to complete your Texas uncontested no-fault divorce forms online.

Our fee includes all of the following, plus much more:

  • Cases with minor children.
  • Distribution of joint marital property.
  • A request for a spouse to change their name.
  • A request for payment of spousal support (alimony).
  • A marital settlement agreement.
You can complete your divorce forms online using any mobile phone or computer, at any time (24/7).
This eliminates the hassle and time normally required to travel to an attorney's office to meet with the attorney and provide all of the details about your divorce, review documents, and to sign documents.
Our affordable online divorce papers service customizes your divorce documents with your specific divorce details. They are then instantly electronically delivered to your secure online account, for your review and use.
For free, you can change the divorce details in your account as many times as you want, and all of the applicable divorce forms will be instantly updated.
When you are ready to file your divorce documents with the court, follow the simple step-by-step filing instructions included with your divorce forms.

Our expert customer support is here to help you.

If have any questions about using our service, our customer support team is available by phone and email.
Start a Divorce
Start a Divorce

Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions

Gerald Bruckner, Esq.
Divorce Attorney
Is it legal to file for divorce in Texas without an attorney?
Does Texas recognize no-fault as a grounds for filing a divorce?
What is an uncontested divorce?
How to file for divorce in Texas without a lawyer?
How to get cheap do-it-yourself (DIY) Texas divorce forms online?
Which divorce forms are needed to file for divorce in Texas?
Does the fee to use LetsGetDivorced.com include the court's filing fee?
How long does it take to get divorced in Texas?
What are the residence requirements to file for a divorce in Texas?
Will my spouse or I need to make any court appearances?
What are the grounds for a Texas divorce?
How is child support calculated and handled in Texas?
 

Is it legal to file for divorce in Texas without an attorney?

Yes. It is legal in Texas for people to file their own divorce in court without using an attorney.
If you represent yourself in Court, you are called a "pro se litigant" or a "self-represented litigant."
 

Does Texas recognize no-fault as a grounds for filing a divorce?

Yes. Texas recognizes "no fault" divorce as a grounds for a divorce.
In a no-fault divorce, neither spouse has to claim in the divorce papers or prove that the other spouse is at fault to end their marriage.
Filing for a no-fault uncontested divorce is the easiest, fastest, cheapest and most stress-free type of divorce. Nowadays, it is the most common type of divorce.
LetsGetDivorced™ specializes in, and can only be used for, no-fault uncontested divorces.
 

What is an uncontested divorce?

An "uncontested" divorce is a type of divorce where both spouses agree that they want to get divorced. They both sign the divorce papers that are filed in court to indicate that they both agree on all of the terms of their divorce.

Filing an "uncontested divorce" can be a great divorce option to get a quick, inexpensive and stress-free divorce.
When both spouses do not agree on the terms of their divorce and they fight their divorce out in court that type of divorce is referred to as a "contested" divorce.
LetsGetDivorced™ specializes in providing a platform where people can quickly and easily complete their divorce forms for filing a no-fault uncontested divorce at a very affordable cost.
When a divorce is filed and granted in the State of Texas as an "uncontested divorce" it means that the parties to the divorce (the husband and wife, or both spouses in a same-sex marriage), have signed their applicable divorce papers that were filed in court, to indicate that they both agree to all of the terms of their divorce, including: the equitable division of their joint marital property (assets and debts) and the payment or waiver of spousal support.
Also, if there are minor children of their marriage they must both agree on the terms of the custody, visitation and child support.
 

How to file for divorce in Texas without a lawyer?

The basic steps for how to file an uncontested divorce in Texas without a lawyer:
  1. You can file for divorce in Texas even if your marriage ceremony took place outside of Texas. It does not matter if your marriage ceremony took place in Texas, or in any other State in the United States, or even in another country, so long as your marriage is recognized as a lawful marriage in Texas.
  2. You and/or your spouse must satisfy the Texas residency requirements.
  3. If you and your spouse can agree on the terms of your divorce you can file an uncontested divorce which is the fastest, easiest, least expensive and stress free way to get divorced. If you and your spouse disagree on the terms of your divorce you will need to file a "contested" divorce.
  4. You must have a "ground" (a legally acceptable reason) to end your marriage. The state of Texas recognizes no-fault as a valid reason to file for divorce. In a no-fault divorce the judge can grant your divorce without ruling that either spouse was at fault. When a divorce is filed as a no-fault case it basically means that both spouses do want their marriage to continue.
  5. Distribute joint marital property. If you and your spouse have any joint marital property (assets or debts) they can be divided in your divorce.
  6. The payment of spousal support, if requested by either spouse, can be included in your divorce.
  7. Resolve child custody, visitation and child support if there are minor children. If you and your spouse have minor children from your marriage, the issues of child custody, visitation and child support can be included in your divorce.
  8. You need to obtain, fill out, sign and file the required Texas uncontested divorce forms with the Court. Your spouse will also have to sign some of the divorce papers.
  9. If you want to file for divorce in Texas without a lawyer, but you would like some help to fill out your Texas uncontested divorce papers so you do not have to do everything completely by yourself, you can consider using a paralegal service or an online divorce forms service.
  10. File your Original Petition for Divorce. In Texas, the process to file for a divorce is started by filing an Original Petition for Divorce.

    The Petition contains the names and addresses of both spouses, a statement that you satisfy the Texas residence requirements, the date of your marriage and other information about your marriage such as whether you have minor children from your marriage.

    After you file your Petition you need to provide your spouse with a copy of the Petition.
  11. Your spouse will then need to file a Waiver of Service in which they can acknowledge their consent to the divorce being granted.
  12. You and your spouse will sign a Final Decree of Divorce that sets forth all of the details of your divorce. The Final Decree of Divorce is the document that a judge signs to grant the divorce.
  13. The spouse who filed the Original Petition for Divorce attends a brief hearing in court before a judge who can decide to grant the divorce and sign the Final Decree of Divorce.

    Note: Texas has a mandatory 60 day waiting period before this hearing can be held. The 60 days starts to count on the day after you file your Petition for Divorce.
  14. After the Judge signs the Final Decree of Divorce you need to provide your spouse with a copy of the signed Final Decree of Divorce.
 

How to get cheap do-it-yourself (DIY) Texas divorce forms online?

  1. Do-it-yourself online divorce papers are commonly called DIY online divorce papers or online divorce forms.)
  2. In a do-it-yourself divorce your divorce papers are prepared without using an attorney.
  3. In a DIY divorce you can obtain blank uncontested divorce forms online that you have to fill out to file divorce.
  4. There are also websites that allow people to complete their uncontested divorce papers online. These are commonly referred to as online divorce websites.
  5. Online divorce websites generate completed divorce forms based on the information provided by their customers that is entered into an online questionnaire.
  6. Some online divorce websites are able to instantly create the completed divorce forms and instantly provide them to the customer for review, editing and filing.
  7. The completed divorce papers are ready to be printed, signed and filed in Court.
 

Which divorce forms are needed to file for divorce in Texas?

Divorce forms prepared online to file for an uncontested no-fault divorce In Texas:
  • Civil Case Information Sheet
  • Original Petition for Divorce
  • Waiver of Service and Consent
  • Marital Settlement Agreement
  • Agreed Final Decree of Divorce
  • VS-165 Form
  • Simple Filing Instructions
If there are minor children from the marriage, the following forms will also be prepared online:
  • Divorce forms for child custody, visitation and child support
 

Does the fee to use LetsGetDivorced™ include the Court's filing fee?

You pay the Court's filing fees directly to the Court and they are not included in the LetsGetDivorced™ $99 service fee to prepare your divorce forms online. Court fees can vary by county and can change so we suggest that you contact the court clerk before you file to find out the amount of the filing fee and what form of payment they accept such as a credit card.
 

How long does it take to get divorced in Texas?

With the LetsGetDivorced™ online divorce papers service you can obtain your ready to file divorce papers for a simple case in as little as 15 minutes.
After all of the divorce papers are filed with the court the case can be finalized in a few weeks before a Judge depending upon the backlog of cases in the particular court.
In Texas there is a statutory 61 day waiting period after the Original Petition for Divorce is filed with the court before the divorce can be finalized and granted.
So, in Texas, the minimum amount of time that it can take for a Final Decree of Divorce to be granted and signed by a Judge is 61 days after the Petition for Divorce is filed.
 

What are the residence requirements to file for a divorce in Texas?

Residency requirements to file a divorce in Texas:
  1. In Texas, when the divorce petition is filed, either the spouse who files it (the petitioner) or the spouse whom it is served on (the respondent) must have lived in Texas for the past six months.
  2. And, one of the spouses must have been a resident of the county in which the petition is filed for at least 90 days before the filing.
At LetsGetDivorced™ it is quick and easy for you to know right away if you and/or your spouse satisfy the Texas residency rules by asking you a few simple questions in the uncontested divorce eligibility wizard.
 

Will my spouse or I need to make any court appearances?

In Texas, if you file an uncontested divorce, and your spouse signs the divorce papers agreeing to the uncontested divorce, then an Agreed Final Decree of Divorce can be granted without your spouse having to appear in court.
In Texas, the spouse that files the Original Petition for Divorce is called the Petitioner. The Petitioner is required to attend a brief hearing in court to finalize the divorce.
 

What are the grounds for a Texas divorce?

Texas has "fault" and "no-fault" divorce grounds (legally acceptable reasons) to end a marriage.
    "NO FAULT" GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE IN TEXAS:
  1. Insupportability. The court may grant a divorce without regard to fault if the marriage has become insupportable because of discord or conflict of personalities that destroys the legitimate ends of the marital relationship and prevents any reasonable expectation of reconciliation.

  2. "FAULT" GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE IN TEXAS:
  3. Cruelty. The court may grant a divorce in favor of one spouse if the other spouse is guilty of cruel treatment toward the complaining spouse of a nature that renders further living together insupportable.
  4. Adultery. The court may grant a divorce in favor of one spouse if the other spouse has committed adultery.
  5. Conviction of Felony. The court may grant a divorce in favor of one spouse if during the marriage the other spouse has been convicted of a felony; has been imprisoned for at least one year in the state penitentiary, a federal penitentiary, or the penitentiary of another state; and has not been pardoned. The court may not grant a divorce against a spouse who was convicted on the testimony of the other spouse.
  6. Abandonment. The court may grant a divorce in favor of one spouse if the other spouse left the complaining spouse with the intention of abandonment; and remained away for at least one year.
  7. Living Separate and Apart for three years. The court may grant a divorce in favor of either spouse if the spouses have lived apart without cohabitation for at least three years.
  8. Confinement in Mental Hospital. The court may grant a divorce in favor of one spouse if at the time the suit is filed the other spouse has been confined in a state mental hospital or private mental hospital for at least three years; and it appears that the hospitalized spouse's mental disorder is of such a degree and nature that adjustment is unlikely or that, if adjustment occurs, a relapse is probable.
 

How is child support calculated and handled in Texas?

In Texas, as in all states, parents have a legal obligation to support their minor children.

When they contemplate getting divorced, one of the most important issues is: How will child support work?

Texas has official child support guidelines that provide very detailed rules that determine the amount of monetary support (child support) that is to be paid after the divorce to support the minor children of the marriage.

The basic concept of the child support guidelines is that the amount of child support is based on what is called the "net income" of the divorced parent who has the obligation to pay child support.

That sounds pretty simple, but the rules are very complex when it comes to determining what must be used to determine net income and when the spouses may be able to deviate from the guideline amount of child support.
The Noncustodial Parent Pays Child Support
In a Texas divorce, the physical custody of a minor child can be agreed to by the parents, and if they cannot agree, custody will be decided by a judge.

Physical custody can be viewed as indicating which parent the minor child will primarily live with after the divorce. This parent is called the custodial parent.

The other parent, who the minor child spends less time with and who has a right of visitation to spend time with the child, is called the non-custodial parent.

Although a judge has the authority to order either parent or both of them to pay child support, typically, child support is paid by the non-custodial parent to the custodial parent.

The custodial parent has the obligation to use the child support payments they receive to provide daily support for the minor child that lives with them. For example, they could provide their minor child with food, clothing and housing.
How to Use the Texas Child Support Guidelines
The Texas Child support guidelines use an "income percentage" method that determines the net income of the non-custodial parent.

If you want to get a basic estimate of what the child support amount may be in your divorce, you can use a free child support calculator that is provided by the Texas Office of the Attorney General (OAG).

This calculator only handles cases where the non-custodial parent has only one source of income. For more complicated situations, you will need to use the rules in the guidelines to determine what constitutes net monthly income and the specific amount of support according to the following steps.
Gross Income Included in Calculating Child Support
For child support purposes, income includes:
  • all wages and salary, including commissions, military pay, tips, overtime, and bonuses
  • self-employment income
  • interest and dividends
  • net rental income from property the parent owns
  • severance pay
  • unemployment benefits
  • retirement benefits
  • veterans' benefits
  • disability benefits, or
  • workers' compensation awards.

Sometimes a parent in a divorce may decide to try to lower or avoid paying child support by becoming unemployed or underemployed.

They should keep in mind that a judge has the authority to impute (attribute) income based on what that parent is actually capable of earning.
Net Income for the Texas Child Support Guidelines
To determine the non-custodial parent's net income for paying child support, you need to subtract the following costs from the total gross income:
  • Social Security taxes,
  • income taxes for a single person,
  • the cost of health insurance, dental insurance, or cash medical support for the child,
  • union dues, and
  • non-discretionary retirement contributions if the noncustodial parent does not pay social security taxes.
Number of Children Requiring Support
After you determine the noncustodial parent's "annual" net income you need to take their net "monthly" income (which is 1/12 of their annual income), and then multiply the net monthly income by a percentage that is determined by the number of children that will be included in the child support.

When the custodial parent's net income is not above or below a certain monetary threshold, the following percentages are used for this calculation:
  • 1 child = 20%
  • 2 children = 25%
  • 3 children = 30%
  • 4 children = 35%
  • 5 children = 40%
  • For 6 or more children, the amount must be at least the same as for five children.

If the noncustodial parent's net monthly resources are less than $1,000, these percentages are each reduced by five percentage points (they will then range from 15% to 35%).

Also, if the non-custodial parent has net monthly resources above a certain level ($9,200 a month, under the adjustment made in 2019), a judge may increase the amount of child support that must be paid, depending on both parents' incomes and the child's needs. The threshold changes every six years to account for inflation.
Health Insurance as Part of Child Support
In Texas, as in most states, in addition to the obligation to pay the child support amount calculated under the child support guidelines, the parents will also have to provide for their minor child's health insurance and dental insurance.
When Child Support May Be Higher or Lower Than the Guideline Amount
Once the amount of child support payable under the guidelines is established, it is presumed by a judge that this amount is in the "best interests" of the child.

However, the judge may order a different amount of child support if they determine that applying the guideline amount would be "unjust or inappropriate" in that case.

The judge must consider all relevant circumstances, including the following factors, when ruling that the amount of child support that will be ordered to be paid will be different than the guideline amount:
  • the age and needs of the child
  • the parents' ability to support the child
  • the time the child spends with each parent
  • whether either parent has custody of another child or is paying post-secondary educational expenses for a child
  • the custodial parent's net resources
  • child care expenses
  • alimony (spousal maintenance) that a parent is paying or receiving
  • the cost of the child's travel between the parents if they live far apart, and
  • extraordinary expenses, such as for health care or education.

If the judge orders the payment of a child support amount that deviates from the guideline amount, the judge must expalin in their order the reason(s) why it would be "unfair or inappropriate" to use the guideline amount.

It is important to keep in mind, that the courts favor agreements; the parents of the minor child can always agree that the amount of child support to be paid will be higher than the guideline amount.

However, if the parents agree that the child support amount will be less than the guideline amount of child support, they will need to explain why applying the guideline would be unfair or inappropriate.

Always keep in mind that the judge will not approve the parents' agreement about the amount of child support unless the judge agrees that the amount is in the child's best interests.
Collecting Child Support in Texas
Once child support is ordered, it must be paid. If you find yourself in the situation of needing or wanting help to collect child support, you may request assistance at the website of the Child Support Division of the Texas Attorney General's Office (OAG) by calling them at (800) 252-8014.
Changing a Texas Child Support Order
It is important to remember that after a child support order is in effect, you may request a modification (a change) of the terms of that order.

To be granted a modification of a child support order, you will need to establish, based on the same legal requirements for an original child support order, that there has been "a substantial change of circumstances" that affects the ability of the non-custodial parent to pay the amount of child support or the need for the change in the amount of child support.

As with the original order for child support, you and the child's other parent are allowed to make an agreement to modify the original order for child support.

But you will still need to appear before a judge so the judge can review your agreement and decide whether it is in "the best interest" of your child to approve that change to the child support order.

In addition to seeking judicial relief in a court to request a modification, you may also request a modification through the Texas Office of the Attorney General (OAG) in its "Child Support Review Process" (CSRP).
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